• There and back again

    And then Yael has arrived.
    Sometimes a moment’s significance becomes clear only in retrospect.

  • 6 Stages on my way to freedom

    It took me quite a while to get here. Years, actually. This is how it happened.

  • Axioms (or: This is me breaking free!)

    ‘So what do you wanna do?’, I was suddenly self-pondering again, and then I realized I was limiting the range of possibilities. The answer ‘should’ be a type of job or profession, while the real answer is ‘to travel’, or even ‘to wander’.

  • New Year’s Eve, India, 2014-2015

    Natalia and I went into the doctor’s ‘room’, along with two nurses. Not a moment too soon, I realized I have no idea what I’m going into. Well, apparently this ‘draining’ process is a small surgery, involving a local anesthesia. Who wouldn’t want to go through his first surgery ever… in India?

  • Manegau – Part 1, May 2013

    What’s your name? Mero nam Tom ho. It means ‘innocence’ in Hebrew.
    The gathering is having a dispersed-but-well-mannered discussion. At its conclusion I am named Asale, which means… innocence in Nepali. So… Mero nam Asale ho.

  • Alone in Pokhara, April 2013

    Freedom Cafe’s jamming stage is run by Tomas, a German guy that likes to spend his time standing on stage while he’s really high, and recite meaningless sentences while the band is playing. When I asked him how did he get to this point in his life, he slowly responded ‘It’s all part of my mission… Freedom!’.

  • Spreading wings – March 10th, 2013

    ‘Don’t look back, don’t look back’, I kept telling myself while steadily walking towards the security check counters, leaving my parents and best friends behind. Take a deep breath.

  • And then the Earth trembled

    The sounds of the falling rocks merged with the sounds of the earth moving, and in a short while the air was filled with dust and it wasn’t possible to see the mountain on the other side anymore.

  • Goodbye, India

    Three months and three weeks.
    My second time in India has been fascinating, diverse, funny, tasty, painful, hot, freezing, exhausting, calming, surprising, annoying and amazing.
    Here are some moments that won’t be forgotten:

  • Farewells, blocked rickshaws, air rifles, Bollywood and our calling

    ‘And what’s your calling?’, I ask her, and she answers right away without hesitation

Natalia and I went into the doctor’s ‘room’, along with two nurses. Not a moment too soon, I realized I have no idea what I’m going into. Well, apparently this ‘draining’ process is a small surgery, involving a local anesthesia. Who wouldn’t want to go through his first surgery ever… in India?

What’s your name? Mero nam Tom ho. It means ‘innocence’ in Hebrew.
The gathering is having a dispersed-but-well-mannered discussion. At its conclusion I am named Asale, which means… innocence in Nepali. So… Mero nam Asale ho.

Red Planet Hotel. I go up the stairway after an exhausting eight-hour ride. I knock on their door, and being greeted by a lovely girl. Her name is Anna. They’re not here at the moment, Begam and Shaked. She’s Czech, she met them while trekking. I met them later that day, along with the rest of their trekking group – Czech Jan, Tomasz and George, and British Simon. They’re really nice, but I… Read More

Freedom Cafe’s jamming stage is run by Tomas, a German guy that likes to spend his time standing on stage while he’s really high, and recite meaningless sentences while the band is playing. When I asked him how did he get to this point in his life, he slowly responded ‘It’s all part of my mission… Freedom!’.

Pokhara is precisely what one needs after a long trek – a lake, calmness, beautiful landscape, good restaurants, pubs, fruit juices, fresh vegetables and fruits (pineapple!), steaks and mainly lots of rest. Cows and buffalos stroll along Pokhara’s lakeshore, and the locals wash their clothes (as they do in any other water source in Nepal). While walking along the lakeshore, we’ve discovered a restaurant-bar called Freedom Cafe. True to its name, the… Read More

Just imagine climbing a steep path in complete darkness while the terrain is slippery, because it’s full of snow and ice that hasn’t melted yet. I’ve never imagined it’s possible to be so cold. It’s literally freezing cold – my fingers are actually frozen, and frozen fingers is painful, apparently.

I’ve been walking in the rain for a few hours. Just before arriving in Timang (2700m) for lunch, the rain stops. Suddenly, the real, snowy mountains finally surround me.

Just before sunset, a snowy peak apperas above the horizon, peeking between the mountains. ‘Milan, which peak is it?’, we ask our Nepali porter. He looks back at us, wonder and amusement painted on his face and resembled in his voice – ‘That one? That thing? It doesn’t have a name, it’s only a small hill! no more than 3500m’.
Oh. That’s All.

The captain asks the crew to get ready for landing. I take a peak outside, expecting to see the lights of Kathmandu. But wait, where are those lights?

‘Don’t look back, don’t look back’, I kept telling myself while steadily walking towards the security check counters, leaving my parents and best friends behind. Take a deep breath.